Have you considered my servant, Iyov?

…that there is none like him in the earth, a pure and an upright man, one that fears Elohim, and shuns evil?

Was taking my brief, mid-day walk, and praying for people who I know are going through things.  I relied on my having been through similar things, in order hopefully to pray aright for them.  Some that I had in mind are dealing with life-long sin issues, things from which they feel they cannot be free.  Some are dealing with substances that control them.  Some, near poverty circumstances.  Some, ill temperament due to personal circumstances and dealing with other people.  I petitioned Abba, not asking ‘why’, but wondering, ‘will they ever truly be free’?  Is it possible that You will, some day, deliver them.  Most of these folks already trust that Yeshua is the Son of G-d.  Some even give themselves over heartily to worship, and to fellowship, and to keep His appointed times [and not those of men who claim to speak for Him].  Yet, they suffer.

Then, the images of children born with disabilities, extreme disabilities, went through my mind.  It always breaks my heart to hear of children born without limbs, born disfigured, born without the capacity to think and interact with the world around them.  Why them?  Some of that, much of it probably, is likely because mankind has taken to embrace behaviors and substances inordinately, or behaviors and substances that G-d clearly directs us to stay away from, and as such, we, collectively, have begun to make being born without defect a bit of a crap shoot.  But, is being born in that condition worse than not being born?

Iyov, Job, came to the place where he began to rue the day he was born.  But, was that right?  G-d finally told him, “Can you thunder with a voice like mine?  Do you have an arm like mine?”  In other words, like Sha’ul said, “Who are you, O man, to talk back to G-d?”

In Iyov’s case, he was innocent.  He was not born with any condition whatsoever, no apparent hindrance in life.  He had succeeded, having great wealth, a beautiful, large family and a loving wife.  And Elohim allowed all of that to be taken from him, finally, all the way down even to His own health and complexion.  He became disgusting to every other human, and only three people deigned to speak to him, and all they did was lecture him about how unrighteous he was.

Yeshua spoke of the man born blind, as the folks around him wondered if he had sinned, or had his parents sinned, and this is why he was born blind.  Yeshua taught that it was neither, but that he was born in order to bring G-d glory.  We all assume the ‘glory’ that G-d got was when Yeshua gave the man back his sight.  But was that the ‘glorious’ part of this man’s existence?  Or was it, by chance, the ‘way’ the man went through his life as a blind man, and gaining his sight was simply the reward.  After all, Iyov went through what he went through with great composure.  And he continued to trust in and love G-d, in spite of his circumstances.

As I pondered these things, reflecting on many of those I love who suffer, I realized, Iyov was ‘chosen’ for that purpose.  It was the will of G-d that he suffer.  Should it matter whether that suffering is done from birth, or later in life?  Might Iyov have been grateful for all those years of health and bounty, while he went through lack and sickness?  Might he have been a rare bird, and really learned how compassionate יהוה  is, in appreciation for all those blessings, knowing from where they came?  It appears so to me.

Then, it dawned on me.  Iyov is the root word of ‘enemy’/’hated’.  The man who was like NO OTHER MAN on the earth, feared G-d, shunned evil, pure, and upright, his very name meant ‘hated one’.  The bi-line above reads, “Have you considered my servant, Iyov?”  Have you?  G-d asked that question of HaSatan, the ‘Adversary,’ the one meant to bring us trouble.  And we can rest assured, that at the beginning of every evil issue of life that we deal with is this ‘adversary,’ this embodiment of perdition.  If we are marked to be the children of Elohim, and have trusted in His Son Yeshua, then you can bet, your name could be placed in the question?  “Have you considered my servant, the hated one?”  The ‘world’ hates us.  Is it possible that in his day, Iyov was the “Enemy” of HaSatan, because he was so ‘different’ than the rest of mankind?  That appears to be born out in his discourse with G-d!

Is it possible then, that G-d, who knows the end from the beginning, ‘allows’ His upright ones, those He marked with His seal, to be ‘buffeted’ by the adversary, to show His Kavod to ‘the adversary.’  Is it possible that G-d, then is ‘proud’ of you?  Knowing that you have what it takes inside of you to endure whatever the hardship is?  Because He put it there [light].  Isn’t that exactly what Yokhanan said when he started his account of the B’sorah?  “And the light shined into the darkness, and the darkness does not overcome it.”   Might that be why in Matti, when Yeshua began to teach the Torah, that He says, “You are indeed the light of the world; a city that is built upon a mountain cannot be hidden. [they do not] light a Menorah and put it under a basket, but on a lamp stand, so it gives light to all who are in the house.  So let your light shine before men, so that they may see your good works and glorify Avikhem [your father, plural ‘your’] in Heaven.”  The person who keeps the Torah is indeed ‘Iyov” to anything born of darkness.  Sickness, disease, affliction, perversion, dependency, conflict, hate, oppression, all of these things are born of darkness, and all of His children are subject to them.  The question is, how do we ‘bear up’ under them.  Do we remain faithful to G-d, as did Iyov?  If we truly are the ‘enemy’ of darkness, then we will.  And G-d KNOWS that.

He did not come to make us all strong.  He came to the weak, to confound the strong.  He came to the simple to confound the wise.  He came to the sick to confound those who are well.  He gives us of His strength, over, and over, and over again, as long as we are willing to fight.  “But we are not among those who shrink back.”

The man born blind, indeed, did receive his sight.  But, look how long he’d been blind.  Not everyone gets healed.  But, everyone who loves G-d and is consecrated from this world DOES glorify G-d, simply by continuing to be obedient, and to trust Him, and not to complain at whatever human ailment afflicts us, but finds His way to the merciful Elohim in spite of it.

Be Iyov.  Today, and every day, if need be.  Until HE is done getting glory from you.  Does He not deserve it?

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